1. Coachella 2014.

     
  2. Robinson doesn’t ask us to meditate, or take more vacations, or breathe, or walk in nature, or do anything that will invariably feel like just another item on the to-do list. The answer to feeling oppressively busy, he says, is to stop telling yourself that you’re oppressively busy, because the truth is that we are all much less busy than we think we are.
    — You’re Not as Busy as You Say You Are (Also, by talking about it so much, you’re wasting time) | Slate

    (Source: Slate)

     
  3. Oh no…

     
  4. "One joke in the BuzzFeed offices is that no one employed there can quite explain to their parents what exactly it is they do. To those parents, I would like to say: I can’t entirely explain it, either, but whatever it is, these men and women are so fucking good at it. They have thought hard about who looks at what and why. Jack has done entire studies on why cats have triumphed over dogs on the Internet. (The answer involves "path dependency," the fancy economics term for when one product, like VHS, conquers another equally legitimate one, like Betamax.) He can tell you with some certainty that a reader of BuzzFeed is equally inclined to click on a photo of a dog or a cat—but that he or she is significantly more likely to share the photo of the cat with others. (Why? "Totally non-data-driven theory is that dogs are trying too hard," Jack says.) …

    The Beastmasters have trained their whole lives for this, growing up (in Jack’s case) with cats, or (in Chelsea’s case) with cats and dogs, or (in Summer’s case) with cats and dogs and “parakeets and ferrets and guinea pigs and rabbits and other things.” They long ago began making viral videos—Jack, before he came to BuzzFeed, worked for PETA, where his campaign to rename fish “sea kittens” made it all the way to The Colbert Report. They are, in short, a team of relentlessly bright people who have dedicated their professional existence to turning the wasting of your time into a precise science… .

    And as the Beastmasters have evolved, their work has gotten more sophisticated, playing on our psychology, our self-loathing, our failure in every other arena to be heroes, even to ourselves. Their mirror shows what it shows. Pulling at random from the past few weeks on the site: “23 Animals Who Are Completely Over Their New Years Resolutions.” “16 Cats Who Care Even Less Than You Do.” “23 Animals Who Understand Exactly How You Feel Today.” “41 Cats Who Had a Worse Year Than You.” “This Sad Santa Dog Vine Will Make You Strangely Nostalgic.” “31 Hedgehogs Who Had a More Miserable Christmas Than You.”

    Needless to say, humans wrote those posts. Our online animal brethren will be fine. It’s the rest of us—sunk in nostalgia, regretting our terrible years, struggling even to care—I wonder about.”

    Where the Wild Things go Viral" | Zach Baron (GQ)

     
  5. image: Download

    kateoplis:

newsweek:

Hello. Good day.
This map has been going around the internet. You’ve probably seen it posted with a headline like “Here is your state’s favorite band.”
But this map does not show what your state’s favorite band is. It does not purport to show what your state’s favorite band is. This map shows what band or musical artist people in your state like to listen to more than people in other states.
The man behind the map, Paul Lamere, gathered streaming data by zip code and then built an app that let’s you compare the most distinct tastes by region. Pretty cool!
For example, according to the map, people in Idaho are way more likely to listen to Tegan and Sara than people in the rest of the United States.
This does not mean, however, that Tegan and Sara is the most popular band in Idaho. What is the most popular band/musical artist in Idaho? I have no idea.
Tom Petty was pretty popular when I was growing up there, but that was years ago. Who knows? These misleading headlines are not the map’s fault.
The map is good. The map is cool. The map shows where in the country you are most likely to run into someone with the same somewhat peculiar music taste as you. (This Map Does Not Show What Your State’s Favorite Band Is)

Dear Newsweek,
Could you kindly place quote marks/blocks around the content you are “quoting” from other publications, in this case, the great Mother Jones? Sourcing it in parenthesis does not adequately reflect that you in fact, did not write it. 
Best, Kate
EDIT: I did send a fan mail to Newsweek about this earlier, to which I received this head-scratcher: 
"The plugin we’ve been using lately doesn’t allow for that but we do edit them in when requested."
Well, being “Newsweek” with all that it entails, I think you probably should be “editing” it 100% of the time, to ensure proper attribution, instead of excusing it as a “plugin” issue and only doing the right thing by request. No?
Newsweek: "Honestly it depends on the post, the author and the contributor. We post approximately 20x a day, some of which are sourced in the way you’d like, some which aren’t."
In all fairness, they have updated this post in blockquotes AND added MotherJones to the link. But.
What say you, Tumblr? Do we not expect Newsweek to place quotes around content it’s quoting from another publication, every. single. time? Or should their readership be satisfied that “some” are sourced in the way we’d like? Is it merely a matter of “taste,” this attribution bizwax? 

20x/day is, what, 2-3 posts per hour? It takes, what, 2 minutes (max) to go into a post and add a ” and then a ” or highlight and click the blockquote button?  It’s neither difficult nor time-consuming.
FWIW, I’ve already unfollowed the NWKtumblr for this reason. I just assume everything they’re posting is from somewhere else, and I don’t have the patience to figure it out if they’re not going to take the time to do it right. Just follow Mother Jones instead.

    kateoplis:

    newsweek:

    Hello. Good day.

    This map has been going around the internet. You’ve probably seen it posted with a headline like “Here is your state’s favorite band.”

    But this map does not show what your state’s favorite band is. It does not purport to show what your state’s favorite band is. This map shows what band or musical artist people in your state like to listen to more than people in other states.

    The man behind the map, Paul Lamere, gathered streaming data by zip code and then built an app that let’s you compare the most distinct tastes by region. Pretty cool!

    For example, according to the map, people in Idaho are way more likely to listen to Tegan and Sara than people in the rest of the United States.

    This does not mean, however, that Tegan and Sara is the most popular band in Idaho. What is the most popular band/musical artist in Idaho? I have no idea.

    Tom Petty was pretty popular when I was growing up there, but that was years ago. Who knows? These misleading headlines are not the map’s fault.

    The map is good. The map is cool. The map shows where in the country you are most likely to run into someone with the same somewhat peculiar music taste as you. (This Map Does Not Show What Your State’s Favorite Band Is)

    Dear Newsweek,

    Could you kindly place quote marks/blocks around the content you are “quoting” from other publications, in this case, the great Mother Jones? Sourcing it in parenthesis does not adequately reflect that you in fact, did not write it. 

    Best, Kate

    EDIT: I did send a fan mail to Newsweek about this earlier, to which I received this head-scratcher: 

    "The plugin we’ve been using lately doesn’t allow for that but we do edit them in when requested."

    Well, being “Newsweek” with all that it entails, I think you probably should be “editing” it 100% of the time, to ensure proper attribution, instead of excusing it as a “plugin” issue and only doing the right thing by request. No?

    Newsweek: "Honestly it depends on the post, the author and the contributor. We post approximately 20x a day, some of which are sourced in the way you’d like, some which aren’t."

    In all fairness, they have updated this post in blockquotes AND added MotherJones to the link. But.

    What say you, Tumblr? Do we not expect Newsweek to place quotes around content it’s quoting from another publication, every. single. time? Or should their readership be satisfied that “some” are sourced in the way we’d like? Is it merely a matter of “taste,” this attribution bizwax? 

    20x/day is, what, 2-3 posts per hour? It takes, what, 2 minutes (max) to go into a post and add a ” and then a ” or highlight and click the blockquote button?  It’s neither difficult nor time-consuming.

    FWIW, I’ve already unfollowed the NWKtumblr for this reason. I just assume everything they’re posting is from somewhere else, and I don’t have the patience to figure it out if they’re not going to take the time to do it right. Just follow Mother Jones instead.

     
  6. image: Download

    humansofnewyork:

"You photograph normal people on the street? I go to photography museums, so trust me, if you want to be successful, you must take crazier photos than this. Try photos with naked people."

That man’s hand seems pretty crazy to me.

    humansofnewyork:

    "You photograph normal people on the street? I go to photography museums, so trust me, if you want to be successful, you must take crazier photos than this. Try photos with naked people."

    That man’s hand seems pretty crazy to me.

     
  7. "It was Evelyn Waugh who said that when a writer is born into a family the family is over. And why would it be any different when a second family comes to call? Julian wanted a brother, a friend, a PR guru, a chief of staff, a speechwriter, and he wanted that person to be a writer with a reputation. When he was working with those fellows from the Guardian, the New York Times and Der Spiegel, he allowed himself to forget that they were journalists with decades of experience and their own fund of beliefs. To him they were just conduits and possible disciples: he is still reeling, even today, from the shock that they were their own men and women. My discussions with him would go on, in private, long after the idea of ‘collaboration’ was over. But he consistently forgot that I am foremost a writer and an independent person. Julian is an actor who believes all the lines in the play are there to feed his lines; that none of the other lives is substantial in itself. People have inferred from this kind of thing that he has Asperger’s syndrome and they could be right. He sees every idea as a mere spark from a fire in his own mind. That way madness lies, of course, and the extent of Julian’s lying convinced me that he is probably a little mad, sad and bad, for all the glory of WikiLeaks as a project. For me, the clarifying moment in our relationship came when he so desperately wanted me to join him on the helicopter flight to Hay. He wanted me to see him on the helicopter and he wanted me to assist him in living out that version of himself. The fact he was going to a book festival to talk about a book we both knew he would never produce was immaterial: he was flying in from Neverland with his own personal J.M. Barrie. What could be nicer for the lost boy of Queensland with his silver hair and his sense that the world of adults is no real place for him? By refusing the helicopter I was not refusing that side of him, only allowing myself the distance to see it clearly for what it was. And to see myself clearly, too: I have had to fight to grow away from my own lost boy, and it seemed right that day to fly a kite with my daughter and retain my independence from this man’s confused dream of himself.”

    Ghosting | Andrew O’Hagan

     
  8. 16:27 20th Feb 2014

    Notes: 1536

    Reblogged from kateoplis

    Tags: oofget that mouse!

    kateoplis:

Never gets old.

NEVER gets old.

    kateoplis:

    Never gets old.

    NEVER gets old.

     
  9. 16:25 17th Feb 2014

    Notes: 528

    Reblogged from nprfreshair

    image: Download

    nprfreshair:


Working with bold isometric forms created from bright neon tape, New York artist Aakash Nihalani (previously here and here) transforms outdoor spaces into playful installations.

via this is colossal

Woot!

    nprfreshair:

    Working with bold isometric forms created from bright neon tape, New York artist Aakash Nihalani (previously here and here) transforms outdoor spaces into playful installations.

    via this is colossal

    Woot!

     
  10. 19:50 27th Jan 2014

    Notes: 1728

    Reblogged from headlikeanorange

    headlikeanorange:

Chilean Patagonia (Planetphoto)

Four days.

    headlikeanorange:

    Chilean Patagonia (Planetphoto)

    Four days.